Dog’s death brings a lawsuit against Nestle Purina and Wal-Mart

Dog
Dog food from Nestle
Purina allegedly caused
the death of an Illinois
man's dog.

A man from Illinois filed a lawsuit against Nestle Purina Petcare Co. and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. due to the death of his dog.

Cleopatra, a 9-year-old Pomeranian, ate several chicken jerky treats for dogs that were purchased at a Wal-Mart and passed away on March 26, 2012, according to Reuters. The Chicago business litigation lawsuit was filed last Wednesday by 57-year-old Dennis Adkins, an owner of a trucking company in Chicago.

The specific dog food that allegedly caused the death of Adkins' pet is called Nestle Purina’s Waggin' Train Yam Good treats. Adkins explains that he did not change his dog's diet but fed her these treats from March 13 to 15 without knowledge of any possible danger. Cleopatra became sick and died of kidney failure 11 days later.

Additionally, Adkins owns another 9-year-old Pomeranian dog named Pharaoh that was not fed the treats and did not become ill. A total of $2,300 in damages is sought by Adkins, which includes the veterinary expenses and the cost of the dog.

In 2007, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued warnings on imported chicken jerky foodstuffs, as many consumers sent in complaints about dog illness related to chicken jerky merchandise from China.

Adkins claimed that he had no knowledge of these and other warnings while alleging that Nestle Purina knows of more than 500 cases of dog illness due to consumption of chicken jerky treats from China.

Nestle Purina responded by claiming their innocence. "We believe the claims made in the suit to be without merit and intend to vigorously defend ourselves. We can say that Waggin' Train products continue to be safe to feed as directed," Bill Salzman, Nestle Purina spokesman, told Reuters.

Other companies in a similar situation to Nestle Purina or Wal-Mart should consider speaking with a Chicago business lawyer offering high-quality legal service.

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